AccuWeatherIQ — The Randall Pearson of brands and advertisers

Accuweather, AccuWeatherIQ, Advertising, Business, Business Tools, Data Privacy, Economy, FTC, Global Economy, Investments, Marketing, Markets, news, Randall Pearson, ROIs, Solutions, Sterling K. Brown, Tech News, technology, This is Us, Trade, Trading, Trends, Weather Predictions

Previously Published to tEQ.life

The average American had never heard of a weather trader or how the weather could play a major factor in the Global Economy – and then, we did. In fact, almost eight-million viewers quickly learned what it meant to be a weather trader, as we became more familiar with one Randall Pearson (Sterling K. Brown), on NBC’s hit television series, This Is Us.  

We caught a glimpse at just how important weather economics were to both trade and the stock market, as Randall pounded away at the keys, making his predictions, and even burning himself out in the process. Investors may have found new ways to capitalize on this practice, as business owners became hip as to how the weather could be used to forecast products would sell, according to last minutes changes in the weather or climate, and its impact on the economy, overall.

If you were paying close enough attention, those charts and graphs were painful to look at – and, maybe even to understand. But, Randall did so quite diligently, meeting his deadline, and the rest became history from there on out.

New scalability with little-to-no effort at all.

Thankfully for you, AccuWeather, one of the world’s most recognized and trusted resources in weather and climate, is making it easier to predict the impact of the weather on business, as they launch a new solution for brands and advertisers, everywhere. With the launch of AccuWeatherIQ, AccuWeather allows the average business owner to target their audiences, based on weather patterns, and has made it possible for those brands to integrate this data into industry-leading data platforms.

According Scott Sameroff, AccuWeather’s Senior Director of Data Products and Partnerships, “AccuWeatherIQ answers a critical need identified by our many advertising clients, which is to efficiently and effectively extend weather-based campaigns from AccuWeather properties across their entire media strategy and spend using the same weather data assets — with assurances that the toughest standards of data privacy, consumer choice and protection are applied to such assets.”

A recent press release further explains that “AccuWeatherIQ will help advertisers connect with U.S. users experiencing a variety of weather conditions today, tomorrow, or ‘next weekend’ [in order to] provide effective messaging based on lifestyle activities and health management preferences influenced by the weather.”

Every day, over 1.5 billion people worldwide rely on AccuWeather to help them plan their lives, protect their businesses, and get more from their day. Since 1962, radio stations, television networks, newspapers, and now mobile widgets on our lock and home screens, have relied on AccuWeather for their ability to accurately predict the weather for days, weeks, and even months ahead of time. So, it’s safe to say that they “know weather.”

Through the use of AccuWeather’s many innovative, patented and award-winning features, including MinuteCast® Minute by Minute™ forecasts, AccuWeather produces and distributes weather-related news, content, and video for more than 180,000 third-party websites and mobile apps, around the world. But, this time it’s different.

AccuWeatherIQ will help advertisers connect with U.S. users experiencing a variety of weather conditions today, tomorrow, or “next weekend” to provide effective messaging based on lifestyle activities and health management preferences influenced by the weather.

Through the use of AccuWeather’s many innovative, patented and award-winning features, including MinuteCast® Minute by Minute™ forecasts, AccuWeather produces and distributes weather-related news, content, and video for more than 180,000 third-party websites and mobile apps, around the world. But, this time it’s different.

By utilizing AccuWeather’s unique proprietary weather forecasts weather data and proprietary forecasting tools, such as its exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperature and Lifestyle Indices, brands will be able to create more personalized and contextual digital marketing campaigns that reach customers at relevant moments in time – with little-to-no effort at all. In fact, weather data segments are currently available and able to be imported directly within Salesforce and LiveRamp Data Stores, in addition to AccuWeather’s owned and operated media properties.

Advertisers will be able to schedule their campaigns, based on the weather, and better budget their spending on days that would provide either little or greater significance to their bottom line. Not only would they cut back on unnecessary spending, but they would have more to invest at times that would prove more profitable to their ROIs. While annual budgets may already be budgeted, based on the month, season or even year, they will now be more flexible and able to allocated based on day, week or even hour!

Data Privacy & Consumer Protections.

In light of yesterday’s decision by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and New York Attorney General that both Google and subsidiary, YouTube, would pay a record $170M fine for allegedly violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), you may be wondering just how this new platform will ensure your privacy, as you make the decision to carry an umbrella to work or make your children wear a rain jacket to school.  

Teaming up with a select group of trusted data partners in data privacy and protections, AccuWeather states its commitment to consumer privacy and protecting the rights of consumers by through increased transparency within the marketplace:

“By working with world-class partners, such as Salesforce, LiveRamp, and Beemray, we are committed to maintaining industry-leading data privacy and consumer protection practices, while supporting business innovation and growth,” vows Eric Danetz, AccuWeather’s Global Chief Revenue Officer. The AccuWeather app allows users to control when AccuWeather or its third-party partners may access user data, including device location data, and for what purposes such data may be used, with clear prompts and navigation screens and specific notice and consent language. 

Keeping this in mind, Danetz goes on to say, “We have been dedicated to building products and advertising solutions that embrace the best practices of data privacy regulations to enable our U.S advertising partners to reach AccuWeather users at the right time and the right place, with the right context, while putting our users in charge of their data.”

Advertisers may not yet be able to change the weather, but at least now they can change their efforts at the drop of the barometer. And, while they may not have a life as perfect as Randall Pearson, they can still rake in the big ones by learning how to invest in the weather economy!  


DISCLAIMER: Neither NBC, This is Us, nor Sterling K. Brown have any affiliation with the AccuWeather brand or its product lines.

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Tech Companies Scrambling to Differentiate Robocalling from Wanted Calls

Cloud Contact Center | TMC Net

Previously Published as a World News Report by TMC Net

Robocalling is on the rise, and much of it is illegal. Because of this, Robocall blocking is also on the rise. There are obvious positives that come with such a non-intrusive technology. But these technologies are preventing legit calls from coming through, such as prescription pickups and important announcements from the local school district.

Not all robocalls are unwanted, so blockers are preventing necessary information from getting to the appropriate party. Nonetheless, these technologies continue to be supported by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Federal Trade Commission (FTC ) and telecommunications companies across the country.

Calls that would normally connect callers to businesses that they are regularly doing business with are now being interrupted, because the definition of robocalling has not be clearly defined within system protocol. Sometimes missing a call is truly a matter of life or death. This is very harmful to whom the call was meant for.

The 2015 Telephone Consumer Protection Act was established by the FCC , encouraging prosumer utilization of robocall technologies. In October of last year, an amendment was made, as the FCC announced that weekly phone data would be released to developers towards the creation of “do-not-disturb” technologies.

Perhaps this technology is so new that the kinks still need to be worked out. Then again, how do we know the kinks need to be worked out if some of our most vital calls aren’t coming through?

Tech companies are scrambling to revise current versions of robocall blocking, but others have already developed solutions that will increase accuracy for the differentiation of the automatic dialer and flat-out spam.

“Once again, the FCC is using the term ’robocall’ in a confusing and misleading manner that confuses legitimate business calls with those from telemarketers and scammers,” ACA International Patrick J. Morris said in October. “It is wrong to presume that just because a company uses modern calling technology that the call is somehow illegal or unwanted.”

There are many law firms going to bat for clientele in efforts to manually stop robocalling from illegal and unethical means. In fact, these law firms claim that their clients are eligible to receive up to $1500 per call if proven to be an unwanted call. The problem is, however, there are many ways to get around the enforcement of such a bright side to the headaches.

Many robocallers are masked through proxy numbers and third-party services. Robocallers are also being replaced by live people who are rang at the same time that we are. Those who are really hurting from robocall blockers are the businesses, which believe in innovation and rely on it to excel in thriving markets.

While companies are required to obtain written, digital or oral consent to engage in robocalling practices with clientele, many companies are being evasive in providing information without this. If you request an insurance quote or information in getting help with your student loans, you are subject to having your number passed around and recycled for months to come. Yes, this includes middle-of-the-night text messaging and other unethical standards.

Companies like Nomorobo and CallCentric’s Sipbroker are working to combat robocalling head on. It is essential to clearly define what a robocall is and what it certainly isn’t – or else, we might not become aware of a major crisis at our child’s school. And, we may miss that important meeting by not knowing that our flight has been cancelled before seeking an alternative route. 

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FTC Success Elusive In Enforcing National Do Not Call Registry

elemarketing software, telemarketing, software, software telemarketing, lead distribution, auto-dialing, auto dialing, branch scripting, call productivity, list-based sales, list based sales

PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED ON TMCNet’s TELEMARKETING SOFTWARE SITE

Every two years, the FTC (NewsAlert) is required to report to Congress on the use of a National Do Not Call Registry. This includes complaints and utilization by both businesses and consumers. Gauging how well companies are adhering to guidelines and finding loopholes surrounding current laws, Congress will have a better understanding on which laws are working and which need to be amended in eliminating telephone spam and fraud.

The checks and balances system aims at bringing the average American a little more peace of mind at the start of their work day and when sitting at the dinner table.

Based on reports covering the last two years, as submitted on December 31, the lawmakers on Capitol Hill have given the thumbs up, as the FTC has demonstrated satisfactory efforts in enforcing telemarketing rules within the business world. Many of us may disagree, especially if we are continuously hounded by those companies texting and calling us at all hours of the night, telling us to “stop what you’re doing…” and trying to get us to spend more on student loan forgiveness programs than we would be going directly to Navient (formerly Sallie Mae) ourselves.

In contrast to those pirates that seem to break all the rules when it comes to telemarketing etiquette and compliance, the FTC has been taking a strong stance against illegal telemarketing practices and undertaking initiatives to combat technologies that allow these lawbreakers to hide their true identity. Robocalling has been a huge priority to the FTC in the most recent of years. The Federal Communications Commission has also adopted this concern as a major priority for enforcing ethical business practices in telecommunication.

Every five years, consumers and businesses must relist their most recent number into the registry database in adding protection to their “Do Not Call” requests. Within this time, callers won’t necessarily stop, but efforts to keep them from calling will keep them at bay. Because everyone does not play fairly, the FTC and FCC (NewsAlert) are consistently trying to combat offenders, while allowing telecommunications companies to operate within the boundaries of the law.

Timothy P. Tobin, a partner at law firm Hogan Lovells recently disclosed affirmations to DataGuidance, stating, “The real problem is where either the FTC or FCC, or private plaintiffs under the TCPA, go after legitimate businesses who are making good-faith efforts to comply with the law. For example, the FCC has made a total mess of the TCPA restriction on auto-dialed calls to cell phones with an overboard interpretation of what constitutes an autodialer and with unduly rigid consent requirements. This has had the effect of being extremely burdensome on many legitimate businesses, putting them at risk of multi-million dollar judgments and settlements for many types of calls and text messages that should not be restricted.”

Within each five year period, the FCC admits that they do scan phone numbers in prompting updated databases, ensuring newly listed numbers are adapted per request – and releasing those numbers that no longer belong to registered users. While it is easier having new numbers listed, because users tend to enforce this on their own, very few people are returning to the registry to remove their number once it is no longer theirs … prompting the five-year rule. After five years, numbers are automatically released from the registry.

Whether or not an uptick in unethical and illegal telecommunications practices subside, consumers are becoming more weary of answering telephones that are LAN line-based – if they even have one anymore. Consumers are also becoming weary of numbers that are not familiar and more hesitant to provide information on the Web that involves telephone number collection. This is one loophole that telemarketers have found in breaking the registry laws.

According to an undisclosed law firm, some of these numbers are hard to trace. And while many of them are able to be sued for upwards of $1500 a call, it may not be enforceable if you have filled out a form online and included your number for contact. Because filling in your number with a verified phone number is becoming increasingly required in submitting long, drawn-out forms. We are finding that even requesting a quote for a specific insurance company will return calls from multiple insurance companies that we have not permitted to solicit our phones.

Our data is being sold and the law is permitting it, because these unethical companies are asking our permission and requiring you to give up your rights to privacy in receiving information. While the FTC and FCC are doing a “good job” in enforcing the laws, the battle continues with these unethical companies. With new practices and the required two-year report, decision-makers in Congress will be able to find ways to continue helping our fight to enjoy dinner just one more day in peace.

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