5 Tips for Transitioning Managers in the World of IT

Medium, Information Technologies, Project Management Professionals

Previously Published to Medium.

Let’s face it, technology has rapidly changed the way we do business — and markets, themselves, are shifting in a major way. We’re seeing steady progression across an entire industry and are taking on higher-paying opportunities in sectors that we never thought we would be. Managers are entering into new markets, as the realm of technology continues to evolve before our very eyes.

We demand innovation and watch it transform on a daily basis. Technologies broaden, but the markets haven’t been nearly as kind. Most agencies are understaffed and roles unfulfilled.

We’re seeing those with no formal education compete against MIT graduates. Project managers are stepping up, some of whom have never spent a single day behind the scenes. We’re seeing interns become directors and start-ups popping up all over the country. More people are working remotely, and central offices are no longer commonplace.

The workforce has become global, and we have begun to control our teams at a distance. We have more power than we ever did, and the possibilities are now endless.

With more opportunities in our hands, all it takes is a little bit of ambition and a simple roadmap to get you where you need to be. Let us help position you on your journey with these five tips for transitioning into IT project management — and ultimately, the transition to success!

#1 | Define your scope, build teams accordingly.

Before defining your scope, you will want to pay attention to your client’s business-related needs and objectives. This will include budget and resource availability, critical timelines and expectations. Your scope will give you a solid foundation to build upon and help you better identify the teams you will need to hire to get the job done both effectively and within a timely manner.

Identify your ideal team members, including areas of specialization, level of skill and how they will interact with one another.

Ask yourself:

ü Do you need them on-site, or can they work remotely?

ü How many people can you hire, and will you need to train them?

ü Will you need to hire an outsourcing agency, or are you going to recruit each member directly?

#2 | Schedule teams based on need, availability and areas of expertise.

Once your scope has been mapped out and your teams have been built, you will begin scheduling each member, as according to need, availability and area of expertise. You should pay special attention to the previous achievements and contributions made to other projects that they have worked on in the past.

Find common ground. Where previous contributions were with companies much larger or smaller than your own, translate scalability and decide whether those team members are capable of handling the tasks that you throw at them. Are they able to streamline daily tasks with speed, agility and a certain level of specialization?

Before positioning each team member, ask yourself how they will measure up against:

· Technical, leadership and/or managerial capabilities.

· Productivity, performance and/or efficiency, both as a team or on an individual basis.

· Dependability, resourcefulness and the customer experience.

#3 | How will your teams interact? Pay attention to interdisciplinary communication.

As you may already know, teams work differently, based on the admixture of personalities types, therein. This is where predictive hiring, behavioral analysis, networking and cultivated relationships can come in very handy for a project manager, regardless of industry.

If you have too many influencers on your team, who will plan and analyze? If there are too many leaders, who will handle administration and ensure compliances? Pairing teams, based on personality type, will allow each team to thrive, while encouraging personal growth and individual commitment.

Friction often leads projects to fail, underperform or fall short of expectation. This often happens when the team dynamic is overlooked and communication falters. On the contrary, teams matched based on personality, prove more productive, as they tend to exceed expectation for quality, turnaround and the overall customer experience.

#4 | Optimize your workforce, define the strengths and weaknesses of new and existing team members.

Similar to pairing based on personality types, we also find that one path to success may actually come from optimizing the workforce, directly. In optimizing the workforce, we look for certain factors or KPIs that will allow us to measure individual contributions and/or takeaways, such as:

· Behaviors in certain environments.

· Reactions to stress or actions under pressure.

· Individual strengths.

· Weaknesses amongst the team, itself.

These points will be indicators that someone is or isn’t a good fit for a particular project. While we can always develop strengths in an individual, sometimes time is a vital factor. Adding new teams would offset those members, who would not otherwise live up to certain expectations — or the skill level, necessary, to carry out individual tasks or timelines, as associated with each project.

Pairing teams, based on personality type, will continue a major hand in the success of each project or client portfolio. However, strengths can be drawn from those individual aspects and used as additional indicators of key personality types we need to recruit in optimizing the workforce, directly.

#5 | Understand missed opportunities in the hiring cycle.

We face many roadblocks, as project managers, when it comes to hiring qualified talents for key projects within our portfolio. These roadblocks almost seem counterproductive from the start of each project and in the development of our teams, over time. We rush hiring processes to meet deadlines and in catering to dependencies across entire lifecycles, therein.

Due to the lack of efficient manpower, budget shortages and the fulfillment of outside obligations, the hiring process is often one of the first processes to be shortchanged at the onset of each project. And because we ultimately must juggle each project on an individual basis, we can’t spend a whole lot of time in the recruiting, training, interviewing and onboarding of incoming talents. We end up relying too much on our immediate networks, career sites and job boards to provide us with the talent we need to get the job done.

To make matters worse, most of these resources will then rely on ATS engines to provide us with a pool of qualified talents, who we must then interview, develop and onboard accordingly. ATS engines, however, will only provide us with those candidates who meet certain criteria and have found a way through key algorithms. Up to 75% of today’s top talents will actually never be seen.

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14 of the Most Common Remote Jobs & Annual Salaries, as According to FlexJobs

remote jobs, remote work, telecommuting jobs, telecommute jobs, part-time jobs, freelance jobs, flexible jobs, flexible schedule jobs

PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED ON RESUME.ACADEMY’S OFFICIAL BLOG

In a recent press release by the world’s favorite remote jobsearch site, FlexJobs identified “14 of the Most Common Remote Jobs” and the average annual pay per position. This list was based on data gathered from within an ever-growing database of work-at-home positions and key factors were highlighted for each of those positions. Additional data was gathered at PayScale.com, and annual salary data was determined in relation to those factors.

The bottom line is this.

As millennials continue to take the workforce by storm, a preference for out-of-office experiences has become the norm. As opposed to sitting behind a wooden desk in a stuffy office environment, many companies are finding value in providing the younger, more vibrant demographic with a more satisfying work-life balance. Contrary to reports that these professionals are being underpaid, as in contrast to previous generation s , these numbers show that some companies still value their workforce and aren’t against compensating them accordingly.

According to the FlexJobs’ 7th annual survey on remote candidacy, 97% of all applicants said that “a job with flexibility would have either a huge improvement or a more positive impact on their overall quality of life.” 28% percent went on to discuss how they were very willing to take a pay cut in exchange for the option to telecommute. They would rather deal with computer-related issues than wear-and-tear on their vehicles, traffic jams and long trips to a physical office location.

Businesses are finding that happier employees, means increased productivity. Work is taking place in record time and with greater quality, overall. Teamwork is less dreaded, as everyone stays connected through cloud-based systems and always-on technology. Collaboration increases, and performance thrives. Not only that, but they are saving money by cutting costs to overhead expenses and salary expectations.

“With many more job openings than workers to fill them, job seekers can better leverage the current tight labor market to land a job that offers the opportunity to work remotely, which has become a high priority for today’s workforce,” explained Sara Sutton, founder and CEO of FlexJobs. “As leaders in the remote work industry, we want job seekers to be aware that the remote job marketplace covers more than one or two industries, and remote jobs are available across different career levels as well,” she concluded.

FlexJobs revealed that “securing a new job is often cited as a common New Year’s resolution, and with historically low unemployment rates in the U.S., job seekers are in excellent positions to find a job with a flexibility that helps them better achieve work-life balance, such as those that offer work-from-home options.” They went on to discuss the fact that “77% of workers said they’d be more likely to accept a job offer if they knew they could work remotely at least some of the time.” FlexJob helps job seekers find remote opportunities on both a full-time and part-time basis.

RESEARCH BY FLEXJOBS.COM:

1.     Account Manager | Average: $52K/year
Account managers can be found at a variety of companies. Their tasks typically involve managing client accounts and relationships. Account managers may ensure client deliverables are met by running status meetings or giving presentations. Some account manager roles may involve sales and travel.

2.     Accountant | Average: $50K/year
Accountants handle a multitude of financial-related tasks such as invoices, billing, taxes, payments, and more. Remote accountants can typically work from home easily utilizing general accounting or company-specific software.

3.     Bookkeeper | Average: $41K/year
Bookkeepers typically prepare financial reports, allocate and verify accounts, reconcile accounts, perform audits, and more. Bookkeepers are often needed to work from home and usually require previous accounting experience.

4.     Business Development Manager | Average: $71K/year
Business development managers typically work to gain new clients and business via phone, emails, in-person meetings, and video calls. Most remote business development managers need to have sales experience, and some positions may require specific knowledge of an industry.

5.     Client Services Director | Average: $87.5K/year
Client services director positions involve handling client relationships. Duties typically include making sales pitches, developing client relationships, and identifying client needs. While there are many remote work offerings, many client services director jobs do require travel.

6.     Customer Service Representative | Average: $37K/year
Remote customer service representatives assist customers via email, phone, chat, or social media. Customer service reps typically find themselves answering product questions, helping resolve problems, and potentially selling services to customers as well.

7.     Developer | Average: $70K/year
Software developers can come with a variety of titles, such as front-end developer, back-end developer, iOS developer, and JavaScript developer, to name a few. Typical duties include programming, developing, and architecting software, websites, apps, or products.

8.     Medical Coder | Average pay $41K/year
Medical coders assign and validate appropriate procedural and diagnostic codes in a medical setting. Specific certifications are often required, such as RHIA, RHIT, CCS, CCS-P, CPC, or CPC-H.

9.     Nurse | Average: $63K/year
Remote nurses provide support via phone or video conferencing to answer patient questions. Some travel to patients’ homes to provide care. Remote nurses need to be excellent communicators and able to coordinate with doctors and other medical professionals in a virtual capacity.

10.   Online Tutor | Average: $35K/year
Remote tutors are needed for all grade levels, including college. Tutoring can be conducted via phone, email, or video chat and a bachelor’s degree or expertise in the subject being tutored is typically required.

11.   Speech Language Pathologist | Average: $60K/year
Speech-language pathologists provide speech therapy services by conducting evaluations, creating treatment plans, and writing progress reports. Remote speech pathologists are most often hired by medical or educational companies and utilize online software and video conferencing to perform tasks from home.

12.   Teacher | Average: $46K/year
Remote teachers utilize online platforms to teach students via video or voice. Much like in-person teachers, virtual teachers may grade student work, hold conferences with parents, and provide one-on-one student assistance.

13.   Virtual Assistant | Average: $35K/year
Virtual assistants provide administrative support to individuals, teams, or companies. Some tasks include handling correspondence, answering phones, booking travel, helping customers or clients, and more.

14.   Writer | Average: $49K/year
A quintessential work-from-home job, writers can find jobs writing on a wide variety of topics and for a wide variety of companies. Those wanting freelance or part-time options can find a plethora, while full-time employee positions exist as well.

Disclaimer: All job descriptions were provided by FlexJobs.com and unaltered to provide our readers with more accurate insight, directly from the source.

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Marketing Through Resume: Achievements Over Duty

Resume.Academy, Talent Zoo, Hiring Cycles, Talent Acquisition, Resumes, Professional Resume Writing, TopResume, Career Perfect, Nexxt, Glassdoor, Career Builder, Beyond, ZipRecruiter, Dragon Resumes, CVNow, USA Jobs, Wounded Warrior Project, Talent Acquisition, Recruitment, Interviews, Human Resources, Duties, Achievements,

This article was previously featured on TalentZoo.com. Click here to see the original article by Jessica N. Abraham.

Aside from the new standards of quality that have been instituted into the new resume requirements for getting past Applicant Tracking Systems, we have to realize that, for most of our lives, we have been writing the resume wrong. Professional resume writers are often baffled at how some of the top professionals at Fortune 500 companies have included so few achievements within their resumes, but have listed many duties!

For the most part, employers already know what your job duties entail. As a matter of fact, it is actually the duty of Human Resources or Administration personnel to know this while recruiting and screening talent.

So, what is it that you achieved with this talent? This is what they are most interested in. They want to know what impact you can bring to their company. They want to know that you can make a difference.

Oftentimes, applicants are worried about the wrong things. For those that have not created financial impact, they may have made a difference through leadership or process improvements. They may have contributed to a process that made things easier for upper management to make a difference. They don’t realize that a little bit of elaboration and powerful wording can really make what they did a great achievement.

Everyone picks on the janitor, so I will pick on the plumber. Let’s say the plumber put on his resume:

  • Plunged toilets and ran chemicals down the drain.

ASK YOURSELF: What would have made this line more impactful?

  • Cleared drains and sewer pipes, plunging and snaking residue from clogged drains, while ensuring sanitation through clean flow of water wastes and avoidance of overflow in living and working areas.

Believe it or not, this method will not only impress employers and hiring managers, but it will also feed ATS with more keywords that will ensure your position at your dream job.

With the standard being set to inclusion of only the last 10 years of work experience, this will help make up for all those great positions and companies that you were only allowed to “make mention of” within your resume. A little elaboration will go a long way.

Resume.Academy positions you for greatness, providing affordable, personalized and comprehensive resume writing services. Our services are easily compared to that of Monster's CareerPerfect, TopResume, Beyond, CVNow, Resume Now, Resume 2 Hire, USA Jobs, Wounded Warrior Project, Dragon Resumes and more!

Are you ready to “WOW” your future boss and/or hiring manager? If so, get with us. Let us write for you!

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