Technavio predicts significant trends in television ad-spending through 2019

Cross-Platform Marketing | Market Trend Report 2016 to 2019

ORIGINALLY APPEARED ON EXAMINER ON APRIL 3, 2016 BEFORE THE SITE WENT DOWN

With traditional media being replaced by digital streams, major agencies are starting to wonder if their advertising dollars are being put to good use. At a time where we pre-record our shows, only to fast forward through the commercials – or when we wait for them to show on-demand – we prefer short 15-20 second videos overdrawn out commercials that we can’t click to skip after so many seconds.

Because digital television allows agencies to redirect new customers to a call of action, digital television should be an obvious priority within advertising efforts. We are relaxing after a long day of work and school. Show us. Don’t make us do more work!

On the April 1, Technavio highlighted three key trends in market growth:

  • Data and Audience-Driven TV Advertising
  • Popularity of Programmatic Advertising
  • Real-Time Bidding

These trends are known as addressable TV advertising.

According to Soumya Mutsuddi, a lead analyst for Technavio, “Addressable TV advertising is gaining immense popularity in the US. It is helping advertisers reach out to their target audiences and generating great results in terms of ROI. Within a common program or navigation screen, this technique is capable of serving different ads or ad pods.

“These ads are targeted by demography, customer behavior, geography-centric, or through a self-selected individual household method. These ads are delivered through satellite, cable, Internet protocol TV, or set-top boxes.”

Addressable TV advertising is made possible across platforms, including digital television and traditional transmissions alike. The company predicts that TV ad spending will only increase with the aggressive political events and upcoming world competitions, such as the 2016 Rio Olympics, European Leagues, FIFA World Cup and the United States Presidential Election 2016. Trends in television consumption are already showing sharp increases at this time.

Taking a step back and looking at the overall picture, one can clearly see that, while targeting specific demographics, traditional media is actually quite broad-based and caters to multiple subgroups or to those, who have shared interest across demographic boundaries. Digital media, however, is customized to the user experience, targeting specific data points and providing tailored content to individual viewers. Digital TV advertising is then able to tap into psychographics on a much more powerful scale.

Traditional television platforms are starting to use these ideals in providing tailored experiences to local populations. Much like YouTube’s ability, for example, to allow users to broadcast their own advertising based on matrices, traditional television is driving local advertisers to engage in television broadcast in meeting their advertising needs. Limited budgets are even being catered to.

Cable companies have recently been adopting the technologies in optimizing online advertising strategies and synchronizing them with local broadcast television. This has been providing them with better visibility and awareness for brands that the local population is actually interested in.

Through programmatic advertising, the automated buying and selling of digital advertising is taking place. These data points are effective, because they are rolled out based on data collected online. But, they are also very efficient, because they save time and provide a great quality of service to the customer. Efficiency cuts costs to process for the company.

Advertising dollars are then optimized. Customers are getting a bigger bang for their buck. Increased quality in inventory allows advertising to allocate more budget for this form of advertising and actually grow their business.

Programmatic advertising has already seen the increase in spending dollars due to excellent placement, from 2014 to 2015. This is only expected to increase and become a primary choice for traditional advertising in a cross-platform type of world.

Finally, the advertising markets have learned that users not only want to enjoy a product or service, they want to have a good story that goes along with it. In marketing and branding, we learn that a good story will sell just about any product – especially to someone that doesn’t necessarily need it.

Trends in online purchases show we spend many of our hard earned dollars on bidding and eCommerce platforms such as eBay, Amazon, QuiBids, PropertyRoom.com and more. We have learned to trust bidding in real time and have learned to actually love it.

There is a certain rush, knowing you are getting a hard-to-find item or an item under its value – and trying to be the winning bidder, against hundreds of others across the country.

Real-time bidding has become that emerging trend in the US advertising market, and it allows us to interact with the brand, show our interests and allow them to gauge our demand. Real-time bidding has become so commonplace that it has “outpaced growth in other digital media platforms such as mobile and social in the past couple of years,” according to Technavio.

Because the digital infrastructure is so developed in the United States, we have become the largest market for real-time bidding in the world. Technavio expects real-time bidding to triple during the next three years and account for 50% of the United States digital ad spending market. This would include those doing business within the United States but are located elsewhere.

Because real-time bidding is an exciting interactive process, users will most likely spark awareness of bidding platforms through word-of-mouth efforts and businesses will be able to reduce advertising costs, model ads according to target audiences and provide better transparencies in ad delivery.

Continue Reading

Sharegate Escorts Proprietary Information to Enterprise-friendly Platforms

Cloud Contact Center | TMC Net

PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED TO TMCNET’S OFFICE365TODAY

At a time when less is becoming more, we’re seeing the tech industry shift to efficiency and centralization. This week, Sharegate released a tool that will most likely gain popularity over the next few months. This tool, like so many others, is promising on better collaboration, communication and productivity. But, most importantly, as cloud-vested as it is, it is focused on ownership and security.

First of all, we need to acknowledge David Roe at CMS Wire for filling us in on the smaller details of this new innovative tool. Next we have to explain why this tool is so important. Let’s break it down.

Sharegate is, in a way, a bodyguard. He’s coming to usher information from Google (News – Alert) Drive, peacefully escorting properties from one user account to a more powerful enterprise account on Office 365. At Google Drive, or Google for Work, these properties were connected and made available through a web of connected users. At Office 365, they will now be stored on a central enterprise cloud with only primary ownership by each user. Sharegate is making sure this data gets to its destination safely – and without getting lost along the way. 

If you’re wondering why anyone would care so much about moving data to the Office365 platform when they are receiving great service at Google for free, then you will have to look at the current business model opposing Google Drive.

At Drive, individual users are owners of proprietary information. Once they delete their account or disconnect themselves from a workgroup, their data is no longer accessible to the team. Additionally, if they delete those files, they are no longer existent. What happens when someone moves on from a company into another position elsewhere – or what happens when someone is fired? They have the power to take that data with them and to disconnect previous shares from each file and drive.

While Google is amazing for the individual user, it is not effective for the enterprise model.

Sharegate is shifting focus by allowing the ownership of these files by individual users, but moving them into possession of the enterprise itself. This bars users, who are no longer part of the company or workgroup, from accessing secure documents and proprietary information. This gives more security to the enterprise systems that have been showing concern where cloud systems are lacking security.

Roe points out one very key fact. Drive was never really meant to be a cloud. In fact, Drive was originally Google Docs and an online storage and device synchronization with open source word processors and spreadsheets. When they partnered with Microsoft (News – Alert), they became Google Drive and increased productivity from within. Competing with Office 365’s new presence in 2014, they became Google for Work through rebranding and focused on collaboration.

With Office 365’s split into a more prominent product on its own, we have been seeing more adoption and partnership from companies all over the Net, as they integrate this product into their own service strategies.  So, again, it comes back to integration.

Not only are enterprise companies given more protection over internal company data, they are also able to integrate with broader product and service lines by using Office 365, as opposed to Google Drive… even if they have to pay a little more to do so. Systems are seeing less breach through this process.

While Google currently reports that over 2 million users are regularly using the Google for Work service, which includes a claim of an estimated 60 percent of Fortune 500 companies, only 23 of over all prominent businesses are actually accessing Drive on a regular basis. While they may have files on the system, most IT departments are slowly migrating files into the new system. The problem is accessibility, inconvenience and time inefficiencies.

A Bitglass report from August 2015 shows a 300-percent growth in Office 365 adoption and utilization by enterprise and small business users with Skyhigh reporting a total 87.3 percent of businesses regularly accessing the system for all their collaboration and file sharing needs.

While 4 million paying enterprise users are said to use Google for single in-app sign on and service features, most of these users are more active on Office 365 according to multiple studies. It is most likely that this four million simply kept their previous accounts, while using Drive for personal and freelance use in their Android (News – Alert) and Google-powered devices.

With Sharegate’s new migration tool, it will be interesting to see whether this influences the reported 4 million still accessing Drive’s current services or if the 2 million active users dwindles down. Making migration more efficient could impact Drive’s adoption and utilization quite drastically.

Will Drive become another Google service that ends up failing them? Most likely not, because they serve the individual user – But, less enterprises will be accessing Drive for their daily operations and collaborative needs. Then, again, Google is already showing signs that they aren’t about to let this happen. The competition begins.

Continue Reading

The Difference Between Enterprise and Mid-Size Customer Service Solutions and Why Aspect is a Big Deal

Omni-Channel Customer Engagement, Omni-Channel, omnichannel, omni channel, customer engagement, self service, multichannel, mobile customer care

PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED TO TMCNET’S OMNI-CHANNEL CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT

As decent-sized business, expanding services to overseas clientele, you might wonder how you fit into “the mix.” Is your company considered a mid-sized business? Or, is it an enterprise? Both come with distinctive needs, and yet it always comes down to whatever it is that the business is looking to achieve.

When understanding which grade of solutions your business requires, take a step back and analyze your business. Identify your direct needs – and what solutions would best help your business to excel. The same is no different from customer service solutions.

What you will find out is quite surprising, really. In a time of productivity and meeting clients where they “hang out” the most, enterprise customer service centers are still primarily phone-based, with agents numbering in the thousands.

While services are scalable, they are usually meant to serve agent populations of over 10K or more. Because many of these call centers are specialized in their line of expertise, they are often preferred in providing vertical customer service solutions.

Enterprise vendors are, slowly but surely, moving away from on-premise solutions and are starting to adopt cloud-based systems. In a way, they seem old-fashioned compared to the mid-sized services that tend to appeal to the more millennial generation. They do provide a plethora of services, including CTI (NewsAlert) integrations, allowing client computers and telephones to interconnect, and agent guidance through the system.

Enterprise customer service solutions also include reporting and analytics, data management and additional case management. Businesses that have been grandfathered into existence or have carved a major chunk out of the marketplace may deem this type of customer service more efficient and cost-effective for their brand. They may feel no need to connect via online platforms with Marketing already controlling a persona amongst audiences online.

While enterprise solutions tend to be more affordable, because they are based on prepackaged pricing, they cost more upfront, as mid-size solutions cost more on the backend. Mid-sized businesses work off of a time-to-value model. Solutions are enabled based on budget, quote or need. Businesses will pay for servicing based on time period for servicing, an outline of scope, a price quote for resources used, upkeep and maintenance, storage and even how large internal teams would become.

Mid-sized customer service solutions, however, tend to get the biggest bang for the buck, serving multiple customers simultaneously in a cloud contact center or work-at-home environment. Dedicated agents number only in the 100s and are available to service customers around the clock and via multiple service platforms, such as social media, mobile delivery and e-mail correspondence, in addition to traditional call center options.

Mid-sized vendors tend to target specific divisions within the organization. Dedicated teams will engage in specific tasks, while much of the solution-based servicing is self-initiated. Cloud solutions allow for internal help desks to access knowledge bases, omni-channel usability and integrated controls. Mid-sized solutions tend to involve more platforms and more automation than enterprise customer service solutions.

Why have all the bells and whistles but no clue how to use them?

Will learning these tools save time and investment in the long run? Or, will they be unnecessary to your organization even if learned? Will it cost a pretty penny to train internal teams to use these tools, or would the company excel having someone else handle your customer service externally? These are the differences between enterprise and mid-sized solutions.

Whether an enterprise customer service experience is taking place or a mid-sized solution, Aspect (NewsAlert) Software has been recently making a name for itself as a business that does more than monitor call center activity.

Aspect combines solutions from both types of servicing to connect agents to solutions, immediately, and better serve customers on the first call. With enhanced customer service features, this suite of enterprise solutions supports high interactivity, automated controls, video and audio integrations, while promoting productivity.

Aspect allows key relationships to be documented and maintained, ensuring each customer receives personalize treatment, where they feel appreciated for their continued business. While enterprise solutions normally aren’t focused on contact center options, the integration will allow for future utilization, as call centers are becoming more focused on how to best serve our millennial generation, who now comprises over $2.45 trillion of our annual marketplace.

Enterprise customer service solutions may find that keeping their current model is not enough, and Aspect helps them stay with the times in caring for audiences of all shapes and sizes. Like mid-sized solutions, enterprise service solutions will need dedication teams for both social and digital customer service needs through larger, more focused contact center systems. 

Continue Reading