Web Leaders Team to Provide Better WebRTC, Broadcast Capabilities

Conferencing, Revolabs, Audio conferencing, Yamaha, Video Conferencing, VoIP

PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED TO TMC NET’S CONFERENCING ZONE

For the last 10 or so years, Oxagile has been a trusted provider of custom and mobile application development services for some of the world’s most Web-prominent multinationals and media powerhouses. The company’s primary focus has always been on video-streaming solutions, but in the most recent years has also been centered on real-time communications.

With TokBox as a leader in the WebRTC community, it almost comes as no surprise that the two companies would team up to provide companies with better real-time communications in leading organizations into better communications and collaboration within the workplace.

As a partner of TokBox’s partner program, Oxagile is able to better embed WebRTC through the company’s signature OpenTok platform. They are able to better broadcast directly into their client’s applications. This means Oxgile will be able to offer their clientele better capabilities to hold Web conferencing and corporate training within their applications and Web portals. OpenTok enables multi-party calling, meaning that project teams can operate face-to-face, even at a distance.

For remote teams, especially those in multinational positions, this platform will bring more unification through regular team huddles and group discussion. A plus for members unable to make meetings, all video calls are able to be recorded, archived and played back through a secure firewall and protection of proprietary information.

Because Oxagile works with more than just enterprise businesses, it is quite possible for other streaming video services to take place through the platform. Streaming video broadcasts, both live and on-demand, is also made possible through this service.

Disney, for example, is one of Oxagile’s major clientele. They provide videos through each of their streaming media properties. Imagine Disney Junior for a moment. Children are able to access Disney-related videos through an authorized mobile platform. The only thing is this: Disney’s video platforms are available on multiple broadcast platforms, including Roku, Xbox, Tablets, Smartphones and more. Oxagile is a force behind the power of streaming Disney.

“We are proud to have become a TokBox Development Partner,” Mihail Romanovsky, Oxagile’s Head of Marketing said about the official partnerships. He continues, “I’m certain the partnership will provide us with new ways to hone our WebRTC expertise. It will also open the door to new business opportunities based on mutual benefit. We’ve got a pool of top quality engineers ready to build custom WebRTC solutions based on OpenTok. As we speak, our team is actively testing the technology’s bleeding edge, including WebRTC annotations.”

A scalable solution for video-streaming platforms, TokBox claims that their OpenTok solution allows software engineers to “deploy WebRTC applications ten times faster compared to vanilla WebRTC API.”

TokBox and competitor Polycom, kicked off the New Year with integrations and partnerships that gave them a head start in leading faster, more productive tech and conferencing experiences in 2016.

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TokBox, Polycom Leading to Faster, More Productive Tech & Conferencing Experiences in 2016

Cloud Computing Magazine | TMCNet, Technology Marketing Corporation

PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED TO TMCNET’S CLOUD COMPUTING MAGAZINE

Recently, TokBox (NewsAlert), a Telefonica company and recognized leader in WebRTC, announced the release of yet another collaborator tool in mobile integrations. While companies are pairing up to bring the ultimate communications experience, TokBox makes its contribution to the overall customer experience, while eliminating some of the frustration that comes with tech support and strategic planning via remote interface. 

As businesses are adopting the ability to engage customers in video-enriched tech experiences, TokBox’s annotation tool allows for convenience in literally pointing out the problem.

Whether through screen sharing or screenshots, TokBox’s annotation tool allows users on either side of the conversation to engage in markup, calling attention to important points within the conversation. While this can already be done through standard mobile editing tools, TokBox allows for live screenshares and annotations through its OpenTok platform.

In tech support, customers can point out exactly what is broken, while specialists can direct customers to exactly which button resets a system and in which direction the switch needs thrown. There is no more room for a twenty-minute conversation trying to explain where on a device the customer should start looking. This cuts back call times, which directly cuts costs for tech support departments and promotes maximized productivity.

TokBox recently released a platform associated with FoxSports and college football. A coach could hold a meeting via remote delivery; strategizing gameplays and maneuvers, similar to what is done by commentators while a game is airing live to television. This would allow college students to be more proactive in their studies while maximizing their potential wins on the field. They would no longer have to skip classes or leave class early just to make a meeting on time.

Like many video conferencing platforms, OpenTok is recordable and able to be accessed at any time. This will benefit those who need a refresher course or would like to study what was discussed during the video conferencing. These platforms are available on both web and mobile platforms.

OpenTok’s annotation tools are currently in beta and have a long way to compete with some of the more advanced tools in video collaboration. But, they are off to an amazing start. Not too many platforms currently allow live annotations, but those that do are leaving our experiences fulfilled.

Polycom (NewsAlert), for example, calls their version of annotation “video whiteboarding.” They actually have created physical tools that allow “in-meeting annotation” and that enable participants to share those annotations on any standard whiteboard or LCD display to everyone on a call.

While basic tools and free form shapes are being made available through these platforms, colleges, such as Harvard’s MIT (NewsAlert), are searching for new ways to make rich annotations available – which would mean encoding more complex algorithms and allowing even more people to join the conversation simultaneously across a variety of streams and a variety of platforms.

In technology, only one’s imagination limits progress. You may not see a need for rich annotation at this point. But in the future, you may wonder how you got along without it. We can thank companies like TokBox and Polycom for their contributions to innovation and for making productivity a forefront of our video conferencing platforms.

This is perhaps an unpredicted and overlooked trend to hit 2016. Will we see more in-conference possibilities that help our business and tech support efforts become more productive? Rumor has it that Elliot Associates’ billionaire, Paul Singer, is pushing for a Polycom integration with Mitel to do just that.

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