14 of the Most Common Remote Jobs & Annual Salaries, as According to FlexJobs

remote jobs, remote work, telecommuting jobs, telecommute jobs, part-time jobs, freelance jobs, flexible jobs, flexible schedule jobs

PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED ON RESUME.ACADEMY’S OFFICIAL BLOG

In a recent press release by the world’s favorite remote jobsearch site, FlexJobs identified “14 of the Most Common Remote Jobs” and the average annual pay per position. This list was based on data gathered from within an ever-growing database of work-at-home positions and key factors were highlighted for each of those positions. Additional data was gathered at PayScale.com, and annual salary data was determined in relation to those factors.

The bottom line is this.

As millennials continue to take the workforce by storm, a preference for out-of-office experiences has become the norm. As opposed to sitting behind a wooden desk in a stuffy office environment, many companies are finding value in providing the younger, more vibrant demographic with a more satisfying work-life balance. Contrary to reports that these professionals are being underpaid, as in contrast to previous generation s , these numbers show that some companies still value their workforce and aren’t against compensating them accordingly.

According to the FlexJobs’ 7th annual survey on remote candidacy, 97% of all applicants said that “a job with flexibility would have either a huge improvement or a more positive impact on their overall quality of life.” 28% percent went on to discuss how they were very willing to take a pay cut in exchange for the option to telecommute. They would rather deal with computer-related issues than wear-and-tear on their vehicles, traffic jams and long trips to a physical office location.

Businesses are finding that happier employees, means increased productivity. Work is taking place in record time and with greater quality, overall. Teamwork is less dreaded, as everyone stays connected through cloud-based systems and always-on technology. Collaboration increases, and performance thrives. Not only that, but they are saving money by cutting costs to overhead expenses and salary expectations.

“With many more job openings than workers to fill them, job seekers can better leverage the current tight labor market to land a job that offers the opportunity to work remotely, which has become a high priority for today’s workforce,” explained Sara Sutton, founder and CEO of FlexJobs. “As leaders in the remote work industry, we want job seekers to be aware that the remote job marketplace covers more than one or two industries, and remote jobs are available across different career levels as well,” she concluded.

FlexJobs revealed that “securing a new job is often cited as a common New Year’s resolution, and with historically low unemployment rates in the U.S., job seekers are in excellent positions to find a job with a flexibility that helps them better achieve work-life balance, such as those that offer work-from-home options.” They went on to discuss the fact that “77% of workers said they’d be more likely to accept a job offer if they knew they could work remotely at least some of the time.” FlexJob helps job seekers find remote opportunities on both a full-time and part-time basis.

RESEARCH BY FLEXJOBS.COM:

1.     Account Manager | Average: $52K/year
Account managers can be found at a variety of companies. Their tasks typically involve managing client accounts and relationships. Account managers may ensure client deliverables are met by running status meetings or giving presentations. Some account manager roles may involve sales and travel.

2.     Accountant | Average: $50K/year
Accountants handle a multitude of financial-related tasks such as invoices, billing, taxes, payments, and more. Remote accountants can typically work from home easily utilizing general accounting or company-specific software.

3.     Bookkeeper | Average: $41K/year
Bookkeepers typically prepare financial reports, allocate and verify accounts, reconcile accounts, perform audits, and more. Bookkeepers are often needed to work from home and usually require previous accounting experience.

4.     Business Development Manager | Average: $71K/year
Business development managers typically work to gain new clients and business via phone, emails, in-person meetings, and video calls. Most remote business development managers need to have sales experience, and some positions may require specific knowledge of an industry.

5.     Client Services Director | Average: $87.5K/year
Client services director positions involve handling client relationships. Duties typically include making sales pitches, developing client relationships, and identifying client needs. While there are many remote work offerings, many client services director jobs do require travel.

6.     Customer Service Representative | Average: $37K/year
Remote customer service representatives assist customers via email, phone, chat, or social media. Customer service reps typically find themselves answering product questions, helping resolve problems, and potentially selling services to customers as well.

7.     Developer | Average: $70K/year
Software developers can come with a variety of titles, such as front-end developer, back-end developer, iOS developer, and JavaScript developer, to name a few. Typical duties include programming, developing, and architecting software, websites, apps, or products.

8.     Medical Coder | Average pay $41K/year
Medical coders assign and validate appropriate procedural and diagnostic codes in a medical setting. Specific certifications are often required, such as RHIA, RHIT, CCS, CCS-P, CPC, or CPC-H.

9.     Nurse | Average: $63K/year
Remote nurses provide support via phone or video conferencing to answer patient questions. Some travel to patients’ homes to provide care. Remote nurses need to be excellent communicators and able to coordinate with doctors and other medical professionals in a virtual capacity.

10.   Online Tutor | Average: $35K/year
Remote tutors are needed for all grade levels, including college. Tutoring can be conducted via phone, email, or video chat and a bachelor’s degree or expertise in the subject being tutored is typically required.

11.   Speech Language Pathologist | Average: $60K/year
Speech-language pathologists provide speech therapy services by conducting evaluations, creating treatment plans, and writing progress reports. Remote speech pathologists are most often hired by medical or educational companies and utilize online software and video conferencing to perform tasks from home.

12.   Teacher | Average: $46K/year
Remote teachers utilize online platforms to teach students via video or voice. Much like in-person teachers, virtual teachers may grade student work, hold conferences with parents, and provide one-on-one student assistance.

13.   Virtual Assistant | Average: $35K/year
Virtual assistants provide administrative support to individuals, teams, or companies. Some tasks include handling correspondence, answering phones, booking travel, helping customers or clients, and more.

14.   Writer | Average: $49K/year
A quintessential work-from-home job, writers can find jobs writing on a wide variety of topics and for a wide variety of companies. Those wanting freelance or part-time options can find a plethora, while full-time employee positions exist as well.

Disclaimer: All job descriptions were provided by FlexJobs.com and unaltered to provide our readers with more accurate insight, directly from the source.

Continue Reading

Marketing Through Resume: Achievements Over Duty

Resume.Academy, Talent Zoo, Hiring Cycles, Talent Acquisition, Resumes, Professional Resume Writing, TopResume, Career Perfect, Nexxt, Glassdoor, Career Builder, Beyond, ZipRecruiter, Dragon Resumes, CVNow, USA Jobs, Wounded Warrior Project, Talent Acquisition, Recruitment, Interviews, Human Resources, Duties, Achievements,

This article was previously featured on TalentZoo.com. Click here to see the original article by Jessica N. Abraham.

Aside from the new standards of quality that have been instituted into the new resume requirements for getting past Applicant Tracking Systems, we have to realize that, for most of our lives, we have been writing the resume wrong. Professional resume writers are often baffled at how some of the top professionals at Fortune 500 companies have included so few achievements within their resumes, but have listed many duties!

For the most part, employers already know what your job duties entail. As a matter of fact, it is actually the duty of Human Resources or Administration personnel to know this while recruiting and screening talent.

So, what is it that you achieved with this talent? This is what they are most interested in. They want to know what impact you can bring to their company. They want to know that you can make a difference.

Oftentimes, applicants are worried about the wrong things. For those that have not created financial impact, they may have made a difference through leadership or process improvements. They may have contributed to a process that made things easier for upper management to make a difference. They don’t realize that a little bit of elaboration and powerful wording can really make what they did a great achievement.

Everyone picks on the janitor, so I will pick on the plumber. Let’s say the plumber put on his resume:

  • Plunged toilets and ran chemicals down the drain.

ASK YOURSELF: What would have made this line more impactful?

  • Cleared drains and sewer pipes, plunging and snaking residue from clogged drains, while ensuring sanitation through clean flow of water wastes and avoidance of overflow in living and working areas.

Believe it or not, this method will not only impress employers and hiring managers, but it will also feed ATS with more keywords that will ensure your position at your dream job.

With the standard being set to inclusion of only the last 10 years of work experience, this will help make up for all those great positions and companies that you were only allowed to “make mention of” within your resume. A little elaboration will go a long way.

Resume.Academy positions you for greatness, providing affordable, personalized and comprehensive resume writing services. Our services are easily compared to that of Monster's CareerPerfect, TopResume, Beyond, CVNow, Resume Now, Resume 2 Hire, USA Jobs, Wounded Warrior Project, Dragon Resumes and more!

Are you ready to “WOW” your future boss and/or hiring manager? If so, get with us. Let us write for you!

Continue Reading

Don’t Forget to Be a Lifelong Student

Previously Published to TalentZoo

When life takes the backseat and we spend more time in transit than preparing a meal, we often forget how important it is to continuously invent self, evolve, and stay ahead of trends. We often forget how to keep learning and adopting new skills; how to form educated opinions, backed by research and facts. And, most importantly, we forget how to breathe.

In a world run by technology, there are many executive professionals that remain computer illiterate. This is fine. Many of them can afford secretaries and administrative assistants to help them progress in an innovative direction. At the same time, they are restricting themselves, hindering growth, and spending time in areas that could be streamlined through technology. That time could be spent focused on taking their brands to the next level. In short, the business world isn’t progressing as rapidly as it could be, and the younger generation is looking to us for cues.

Mentorship is amazing because we can get shortcuts to decision-making methods, adopt specific processes, and learn things about our industries that we never knew we never knew. We learn details about business that are either kept “hush, hush” or just not shared amongst “newbies.” We learn so much, but then we lose the need to go to our mentors other than for advice. We forget how valuable they continue to be to our growth. Sometimes, we even outgrow those mentors to where there is nothing that can really be learned from them.

So, let’s talk about innovation. For every hardware or software technology that you have ever learned and implemented into your daily workday, there have been upgrades…unless the company closed its doors to the public. Not upgrading software over the course of a few years can make a huge difference. Not upgrading from one version to the next can make a huge difference.

For example: Audio engineers who stayed true to their Focusrite devices and didn’t upgrade from 6.7 LE until version 8 or 9 came out were in for a big change. While many of the smart keys stayed the same, much of the system had been rearranged with a newly designed and more aesthetic interface. Now, in version 12, you can bet that buffers, plugins, and bugs have been upgraded or fixed and made more efficient. If you’re an audio engineer, you understand exactly what this means. If you’re not, this idea is definitely transferable to multiple platforms in technology. As a matter of fact, I am still upset that Safari seems to have removed the “activity” window in its most recent upgrade. I relied on that for quickly locating files that were in use on a web page at that particular moment.

Changing technologies force us into quickly learning and adopting new ways of doing things, based on immediate need. What would happen if we simply learned for the sake of learning? How much more results-oriented would we be when implementing our new technologies or adopting them for the benefits that they could bring? Technology aside, why aren’t we consistently picking up soft skills that will add to our value in the marketplace? Why aren’t we finding ways to combine our knowledge of one subject with the next in creating something interesting?

I’m sure your answer was that you have no time. Am I right? Consider this: While you are in the car, the most cliché thing you can do is listen to an audiotape. Why don’t you do it? Today, you don’t need to rely on tapes. You can find videos or audio on just about any subject through your mobile device. You can even download audiobook players that will keep you occupied for hours and return you right back to where you left off, no matter which device you are accessing the information from. While this is so easy to do, there are many that would rather not know about something to have the excuse that they “don’t know how.” The same goes for basic software and programming skills. If you’re a hands-on person, learn management. If you’re a supervisor, learn something technical.

If you work in marketing, content creation, or design strategies, you probably have seen where your chances of getting a particular job or client would be heightened if only you knew how to do minor coding, use some unknown software program, or work with WordPress. While you are a superstar in marketing, you hate showing numbers for fear that you present them wrong. After all, you can read them and understand them, but explaining numbers is just not your forte. You need to change this quickly! It’s time you stop letting these fears get the best of you. Just go for it. Immersing yourself in learning is the best way to gain new skills. In addition to audiobooks, ebooks, tutorials, and user-generated classes, there are free mobile apps available to help you evolve through interactive quizzes and games. They can be fun, and many reward you with official certifications that always appeal to your clients and bosses.

Any seasoned professional agrees that while rebranding isn’t a great option, reinventing yourself every so many years is almost inevitable. You must evolve to meet technology advances. In order to be ahead of the game, you become an early adopter. This will keep you ahead of industry trends and ensure that you will impact the revenue of your company for the better. As markets saturate, and the less evolved you become, the less business you will continue to keep. If you want to maximize your value and salary, do whatever it takes to make business happen for you. Take risks. Network.

Or don’t. The choice is yours.

Whatever you do, don’t forget to be a lifelong student of progress.

Continue Reading